FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  • How quickly can you deliver?

    We offer nationwide delivery which operates via an external courier service. To most UK postcodes we operate on a 48hour turnaround. If you place an order on a Monday, we can usually deliver on the Wednesday of that week at the earliest, or you can specify any working day after. Speak to an adviser if you have an unusually large load or live outside of the postcodes advertised on our website. We do not deliver on a Saturday, Sunday or Bank Holiday unfortunately.

  • Do you sell split packs?

    Yes we do sell split packs. You can order any quantity you like although the goods are despatched from different yards according to whether they are split or not. Splitting a pack means we have to despatch from our staffed stock yard and the pricing structure is slightly different. Should you need a split pack we are just a phone call away so please do not hesitate to contact us.

  • Do we supply laying patterns?

    We do not supply laying patterns whatsoever unfortunately. The majority of our patio packs are ideally laid in courses, which means each different slab size has one side which is the same length as the others (560mm usually). So the slabs are laid in rows (‘courses’) which are 560mm wide and then the different lengths are alternated randomly. We also do a four size patio pack which is laid completely randomly. Whichever patio pack you use, all slabs are made with dimensions with divisions and multiples of each other so you wouldn’t be forced to make cuts to complete the patio.

  • How to lay your paving slabs?

    Most of our patio paving slabs have been cut with a slightly chamfered edge meaning one side is a smaller, chiselled surface area and the other side is a bigger, flatter surface. The slabs are intended to be laid with the smaller, chiselled surface on the underside, which allows more mortar to squeeze up towards the joints. This gives a better adhesion of the slabs to the ground and gives you a tighter, neater joint.

    We advise you lay external slabs on a full bed of sand and wet cement mixed (rather than dot and dab technique) to support the slab throughout the underside. This avoids any weak/pressure points which can lead to cracks in extreme weather conditions.

  • How to lay your tiles?

    Our tiles are ideally laid with flexible adhesive and finished with a flexible grout. Grout is usually available in a selection of colours. If you need adhesive and grout with your order, please give us a call. Alternatively these products are readily available to buy from your local builders merchant or any home improvements store, and you will also need sealant to help protect the stone from stains in the home. We are unfortunately unable to send the sealant long distance (via courier) due to the flammable nature of it, but a natural stone being laid indoors should always be sealed. We recommend you lay the tiles, seal them once before grouting, then grout them, then seal them a second time, ensuring the tiles are clean and dry between each stage.

  • How to calculate your quantity?

    To calculate your quantity, you simply multiply the length by the width of your area. You should also allow an additional 10% extra on top of this area which is for cuts, wastage and the odd breakage which can occur on site, or in transit. For very complex designs there may be more cuts and you may need more, or for very simple shapes you may get away with slightly less however you should always have a little extra when dealing with natural stone tiles and flags.

    Everything we sell is per metre squared or per ‘m2’. This is a calculation of the area coverage. Once, in the not so distant past, someone ordered a 15m2 patio pack expecting it to be 15m x 15m (£225m2) so they were quite aghast when one patio pack showed up to find that ‘m2’ was the area coverage and the couple of hundred pounds they paid would sadly not cover 225m2. We have faith that our customers are bright as a button and couldn’t possibly make an error of this epic proportion but we just thought it was worth mentioning!